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Comparison of The Toy Fox Terrier Breed Standards

 

For study and comparison, here are both Toy Fox Terrier breed standards, side-by-side. There was debate regarding AKC's decision to put the breed in the Toy Group instead of the Terrier Group where it has always been in UKC. Some think it would have been easier to win in one Group or the other but I think it would not have mattered then and doesn't matter now as AKC tries to split all breeds into 10 groups. Breed Clubs are having no part of it.

 

The Toy Fox Terrier still has a long way to go towards uniformity of type and quality in order to be very competitive in either group. Judges are learning but as a Toy Group judge, most simply "inherited" the Toy Fox Terrier breed when AKC assigned it to that Group.

There is also controversy about the additional breeds added in the Breed History section of the 2003 AKC Toy Fox Terrier revision, namely Miniature Pinschers (referred to as Min Pins!) and Italian Greyhounds. Just as purebreds today may be anything but pure, there is no doubt that these and many other breeds are behind the Toy Fox Terrier but their influence is minimal compared to that of the Smooth Fox Terrier, Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some breed authorities believe that the "IG" and the "Min Pin" came much later and could account for the chocolate color not found in the Smooth Fox or Manchester.

The UKC Toy Fox Terrier Standard changes were minor and not recent. The AKC changes are recent and more controversial. I have included links to the original breed standard and history, which was also changed.


United Kennel Club
UKC Breed Standard - Terrier Group

Revised January 1, 1999

 

History  

The immediate ancestor of the Toy Fox Terrier is the larger Smooth Fox Terrier. The original Fox Terrier breed standard was written in England in 1876. The size of the breed at that time was 18 to 20 pounds. Owners of these brave little dogs found that the smallest, which they called "runts", were the scrappiest of the bunch. These little dogs were prized for their temperament. Smaller dogs were developed and eventually were found in the seven-pound range.

 

The United Kennel Club began registering the Smooth Fox Terrier in 1912. Between then and the mid-1920's, the Toy Fox Terrier was developed, being a miniature of the previous breed, however they were still registered under the name of Fox Terrier (Smooth). Those dogs appear almost identical to the dogs of today. It was not until February 24, 1936, that U.K.C. began registering the Toy Fox Terrier under its current name.

 

General Appearance

 The Toy Fox Terrier is small in size, with a body that is square when viewed from the side. The length of the head, neck and legs are in proportion to the length and depth of the body. The body is compact, with the short tail carried upright. With a short, glossy coat that is predominantly white, the appearance is elegant, balanced and aristocratic. Highly intelligent, alert, loyal, fearless and having much endurance, this small dog, above all, has the conformation, characteristics and personality of a terrier.

 

Characteristics
The Toy Fox Terrier is self-possessed, spirited and determined. They are energetic, lively and strong for their size. They are not easily intimidated by other pets. Most are comical, entertaining and playful all of their life, which is generally long in comparison to many other breeds. They are friendly and loyal to their master or owners, yet protective. As a rule they are easily trained and adapt to showing in conformation and obedience.

 

Any individuals lacking good terrier attitude and personality are to be faulted.

 

Head
A typical head unmistakably stamps the dog as being of this breed.

 

The head is in proportion to the rest of the body. It resembles a blunt wedge when viewed from both the front and in profile. When viewed from the front, the head widens gradually from the black nose to the base of the ears in practically an unbroken line. The distance from the nose to the stop is equal to the distance from the stop to the occiput.

 

The skull is moderate in width and slightly rounded. The skull and muzzle are both in proportion to the length and overall size of the head. The muzzle tapers gradually from the base of the ears to the nose. Medium stop; somewhat sloping.

 

The cheeks are flat and muscular, with the area below the eyes well filled-in.

 

Close-lying lips.

Serious Faults: Domed skull (apple head). Flat skull. Deep, sharp stop. Shallow stop. Roman nose.

Faults: Backskull or foreskull too wide. Narrow muzzle. Wide muzzle. Short muzzle. Long muzzle. Cheeks too bulgy or too flat.

 

TEETH -- A full complement of strong, white teeth meeting in a scissors bite is preferred. An even bite is permissible. Loss of teeth should not be faulted for a dog of any age as long as the bite can be determined as correct.

Faults: Overshot over 1/16 inch. Puppy teeth retained after one year of age.

 

EYES -- Dark in color; as dark as possible being preferred. Clear and bright, with a soft, intelligent expression. Globular, round, and somewhat prominent, yet not bulging. They are set well apart and fit well into the sockets.

 Faults: Light color. Too large or too small. Protruding. Squinty. Dull. Set too wide apart. Set too close together. Lack of expression.

 

NOSE -- The nose is black in color. Puppies are usually born with pink-colored noses, which generally turn dark before or by weaning time.

 Faults: Brown nose. Brownish tinge. Small pink or flesh-colored specks on nose.

 

EARS -- Pointed, inverted, V-shaped: placed well up on the sides of the head. Close together, but never touching. The inner base is on a level with the top of the skull. Always erect when alert; carried erect in motion. The size is in proportion to the size of the head and the overall size of the dog.

 Serious Faults: Rounded. Set too wide apart. Low-set. Too large. Too small. Flop ears.

 

Neck

 The length of the neck is approximately the same as that of the head and is in proportion to the body and size of the dog. The neck widens gradually, blending smoothly into the shoulders. The neck is clean and is slightly arched in a graceful curve.
Faults: Neck too short, too thick or with loose, excess skin. Ewe neck. Goose neck.

 

Forequarters

The shoulders are sloping and well-laid-back (approximately at a 45 degree angle); blending smoothly from neck to back.

 

FORELEGS -- When viewed from the side, the forelegs are straight from the elbows to the feet, which point forward. When viewed from the front, the forelegs are some distance apart and drop straight from the elbows to the feet. The elbows are close and perpendicular to the body. The pasterns are strong and straight while remaining flexible. Bone size is in proportion to the size of the dog.

 

Dewclaw removal is optional, but recommended.

Faults: Straight shoulders. Loaded shoulders. Steep shoulders. Down in withers. Too far apart at withers. Out at elbows. Tied in elbows. Down in pasterns. Bowed front.

 

Body

In shape, the body appears square when viewed from the side, with height approximately equal to length. The height is measured from the highest point of the withers to the bottom of the front feet. The length is measured from the prosternum (front point of the shoulder - forechest) to the point of the buttocks.

 

The body is balanced and tapers slightly from the ribs to the flank, with an evident, moderate tuck-up.

 

The back is short and strong. The backline is strong, straight and firm, blending smoothly from the neck and shoulder to the tail.

 

The chest is deep, with an oval-shaped, well-sprung rib cage. The brisket extends to or just above the elbows. The chest is in proportion and in balance with the rest of the body.

Serious Faults: Sway back. Roach back. Sloping croup. Taller at hips than at withers. Taller at withers than at hips. Short-bodied. Long-bodied. Too much or too little tuckup. Lack of muscling. Muscle bound. Barrel-chested. Narrow chest. Brisket too shallow or too deep. Pointed brisket (when viewed from front.)

 

Hindquarters

Strong and muscular; free of droop or crouch. The rump is well-filled-in on each side of the tail. The hipbones are on a level with or just below the back. Good width and depth at pelvis. Good muscling over hips, blending smoothly down over the upper to the lower thighs.

 

Any male six months of age, or older, should have two normal size testicles clearly visible and well-seated in the scrotum.

 

HIND LEGS -- The hind legs appear strong and straight down to the feet. The upper and lower thighs are strong, well-muscled and of good length. The stifles are clearly-defined and well-angulated. The hocks are well bent. When viewed from the rear, the stifles, hocks and feet are straight and parallel to each other. Bone size is in proportion to the size of the dog. If present, dewclaws are removed.

Serious Faults: Sloping, breaking off in rump. Narrow and/or shallow pelvis. Faults: Hind legs lacking angulation or over-angulated. Hipbones above the back level. Lack of muscle in hips and thighs. Too much muscle in hips and thighs. Thighs too short or too long. Bow-hocked. Cowhocked. Straight in stifle. Over-angulated stifle. Stifles turning in or out. Legs too close together or too far apart.

 

Feet

The feet are oval in shape and compact, with arched toes and hard, tough and well-cushioned pads.

Faults: Round feet. Splayed. Flat. Feet turned in or out.

 

Tail

 Set on high and on a level with the back. Carried gaily, above the horizontal line of the back when the dog is in motion or at attention; may be dropped when the dog is at ease. Docked with approximately 2/5th of the full tail remaining; equivalent length if a bobtail. Minimum length about one inch, maximum length about three inches, for dogs six months of age or older.

Serious Faults: Tail curled. Tail carried straight over the back. Set too low.

Faults: Too short. Too long. Not carried gaily when in motion.

 

Coat

A distinguishing feature of the breed, the coat is short, satiny and shiny; fine in texture and smooth to the touch. It is slightly longer at the ruff (back of neck and shoulder); uniformly covering the body. The underline, inside of front legs, and lower part of back legs are covered with at least a thin coat of hair. The skin is firm but pliable.

Serious Fault: Wiry coat.

Faults: Too long, too coarse. Dry and dull. Too thin. Loose or non-pliable skin.

 

Color

White is the predominating body color. White is not the predominating head color. Predominating to mean "more than half".

 

ACCEPTABLE COLORS & COLOR PATTERNS

 

-- White and black with tan trim.

 

Black predominates on the head. The ears are black on the back with a very narrow, black rim on the inner edge. The tan trim is found on the cheeks and/or chops and as eye dots. Face with or without a white blaze. A blaze may extend onto either or both sides of the lower muzzle. White frost or tiny white spots on the lower muzzle are acceptable. White is the predominating body color, with or without black spots. Ticking is permitted to some degree provided the white predominates and general good looks are maintained. It is preferred that the black markings be free of any tan or brown shadings or very small tan or brown spots, but not faulted.

 

-- White and Black

 

Everything in regard to color and markings are the same as above, except there is no tan trim.

 

-- White and Tan

 

Tan predominates on the head. The ears are tan on the back with a very narrow tan rim on the inner edge. Trim is a lighter or darker shade of tan on the cheeks and/or chops and eye dots, if visible. Face with or without a white blaze. The blaze may extend onto either or both sides of the lower muzzle. White frost or tiny white spots on the lower muzzle are acceptable. The body is predominantly white, with or without tan spots. Ticking is permitted to some degree provided the white predominates and general good looks are maintained. It is preferred that the tan markings be free of any black or brown shadings or very small black or brown spots, but not faulted.

 

Faults: A wide blaze that extends up to the eyes. Black or tan coloring, other than speckling (ticking) on the legs below the wrist joint of the forelegs or the hock joint of the hind legs. Any variation from that which is stated for the color and markings in any color combination is a fault. In a White and Tan - tan markings that are too red, chocolate- shaded or brindled.

 

Weight

Dogs six months of age or older must weigh from three-and-one-half up to, and including, seven pounds.

 

Gait

Movement is smooth and flowing, with the legs moving straight, parallel and in a line at a walk or slow trot, with the back straight and the head and tail up. There is balance and coordination with good reach in the front and good drive from the rear. Movement is used to evaluate gait and to evaluate the parts involved in gait, therefore the points allotted to movement are included when considering all the dog's structural parts involved.

 

In gaiting, the stifles, hocks and feet should turn neither in nor out, and the hind legs should move in line with the front legs.

Serious Fault: Hackney gait.

 

Disqualifications

Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Extreme viciousness or shyness. Undershot bite. Overshot bite of more than 1/8 inch. Wry mouth. Liver colored nose. Dudley nose. No tail. Dogs of any age over seven pounds. Any dog six months of age or older weighing less than three-and-one-half pounds. Ears not erect on any dog over six months of age. Any solid-colored dog. Maltese or chocolate markings. Any color combination in which white is not the predominant body color. Any color combination other than stated combinations. In any color combination, any dog whose head is more than half white. Any dog whose head and/or ear color and body spots are of different colors.

American Kennel Club
AKC Breed Standard - Toy Group

Approved: July 8, 2003

History
To create this breed, some American fanciers crossed small Smooth Fox Terriers with various toy breeds including Min Pins, Italian Greyhounds, Chihuahuas and Manchester Terriers. The resulting dog - the Toy Fox Terrier - retained the gameness from the terriers and a milder, more "livable" disposition from the other breeds used. This truly American creation is a big dog in a small package, possessing intelligence, courage and a take-charge attitude. Today, the Toy Fox Terrier is a well-balanced toy dog of athletic appearance displaying grace and agility in equal measure with strength and stamina. From the hunt to the show ring, the Toy Fox Terrier has become a cherished companion dog and excellent show piece. The Toy Fox Terrier has shown that he is at home in conformation, obedience and agility trials, his favorite spotlight is the center stage of his owner's life.

The Toy Fox Terrier is a toy and a terrier, and both have influenced his personality and character. While retaining the terrier gameness, courage and animation. The cross-breeding with various toy breeds still a working terrier, and many of them delight in hunting and going to ground. Given the opportunity, the Toy Fox Terrier will pursue the quarry of the backyard or barnyard with diligence. Known to tree squirrels and flush out rodents, the hunt is always welcome. Flyball or fetch are easily learned and perfected for endless hours of activity. However, if you enjoy a lap dog, this little companion appears to know the latest in television entertainment of his household. Children especially enjoy the unending energy and zeal for play throughout this dog's life.


General Appearance
The Toy Fox Terrier is truly a toy and a terrier and both have influenced his personality and character. As a terrier, the Toy Fox Terrier possesses keen intelligence, courage, and animation. As a toy his is diminutive, and devoted with an endless abiding love for his master. The Toy Fox Terrier is a well-balanced Toy dog of athletic appearance displaying grace and agility in equal measure with strength and stamina. His lithe muscular body has a smooth elegant outline which conveys the impression of effortless movement and endless endurance. He is naturally well groomed, proud, animated, and alert. Characteristic traits are his elegant head, his short glossy and predominantly white coat, coupled with a predominantly solid head, and his short high-set tail.

 
Size, Proportion and Substance
Size: 8.5 - 11.5 inches, 9 -11 preferred, 8.5 - 11.5 acceptable. Proportion: The Toy Fox Terrier is square in proportion, with height being approximately equal to length; with height measured from withers to ground and length measured from point of shoulder to buttocks. Slightly longer in bitches is acceptable. Substance: Bone must be strong, but not excessive and always in proportion to size. Overall balance is important.
Disqualification: Any dog under 8.5 inches and over 11.5 inches.
 
Head
The head is elegant, balanced and expressive with no indication of coarseness. Expression is intelligent, alert, eager and full of interest.

Eyes: clear, bright and dark, including eye-rims, with the exception of chocolates whose eye-rims should be self-colored. The eyes are full, round and somewhat prominent, yet never bulging, with a soft intelligent expression. They are set well apart, not slanted, and fit well together into the sockets.

Ears: The ears are erect, pointed, inverted V-shaped, set high and close together, but never touching. The size is in proportion to the head and body.
Disqualification: Ears not erect on any dog over six months of age.

Skull: is moderate in width, slightly rounded and softly wedge shaped. Medium stop, somewhat sloping. When viewed from the front, the head widens gradually from the nose to the base of the ears. The distance from the nose to the stop is equal to the distance from the stop to the occiput. The cheeks are flat and muscular, with the area below the eyes well filled in.
Faults: Apple head.

Muzzle: Strong rather than fine, in proportion to the head as a whole and parallel to the top of the skull.

Nose: Black only with the exception of self-colored in chocolate dogs.
Disqualification: Dudley nose.

Lips: are small and tight fitting.

Bite: a full complement of strong white teeth meeting in a scissors bite is preferred. Loss of teeth should not be faulted as long as the bite can be determined as correct.
Disqualification: Undershot, wry mouth, overshot more than 1/8 inch.
 
Neck, Topline and Body
The neck is carried proudly erect, well set on, slightly arched, gracefully curved, clean, muscular and free from throatiness. It is proportioned to the head and body and widens gradually blending smoothly into the shoulders. The length of the neck is approximately the same as that of the head. The topline is level when standing and gaiting. The body is balanced and tapers slightly from ribs to flank. The chest is deep and muscular with well sprung ribs. Depth of chest extends to the point of elbow. The back is straight, level, and muscular. Short and strong in loin with moderate tuck-up to denote grace and elegance. The croup is level with topline and well-rounded. The tail is set high, held erect and in proportion to the size of the dog. Docked to the 3rd or 4th joint.
 
Forequarters
Forequarters are well angulated. The shoulder is firmly set and has adequate muscle, but is not overdeveloped. The shoulders are sloping and well laid back, blending smoothly from neck to back. The forechest is well developed. The elbows are close and perpendicular to the body. The legs are parallel and straight to the pasterns which are strong and straight while remaining flexible. Feet are small and oval, pointing forward turning neither in nor out. Toes are strong, well-arched and closely knit with deep pads.
 
Hindquarters
Hindquarters are well angulated, strong and muscular. The upper and lower thighs are strong, well muscled and of good length. The stifles are clearly defined and well angulated. Hock joints are well let down and firm. The rear pasterns are straight. The legs are parallel from the rear and turn neither in nor out. Dewclaws should be removed from hindquarters if present.
 
Coat
The coat is shiny, satiny, fine in texture and smooth to the touch. It is slightly longer in the ruff, uniformly covering the body.
 
Color
Tri-Color: Predominately black head with sharply defined tan markings on cheeks, lips and eye dots. Body is over fifty-per-cent white, with or without black body spots. White, Chocolate and Tan: Predominately chocolate head with sharply defined tan markings on cheeks, lips and eye dots. Body is over fifty-percent white, with or without chocolate body spots. White and Tan: Predominately tan head. Body is over fifty-percent white with or without tan body spots. White and Black: Predominately black head. Body is over fifty percent white with or without black body spots. Color should be rich and clear. Blazes are acceptable, but may not touch the eyes or ears. Clear white is preferred, but a small amount of ticking is not to be penalized. Body spots on black headed tri-colors must be black; body spots on chocolate headed tri-colors must be chocolate; both with or without a slight fringe of tan alongside any body spots near the chest and under the tail as seen in normal bi-color patterning.
Faults: Color, other than ticking, that extends below the elbow or the hock.
Disqualifications: A blaze extending into the eyes or ears. Any color combination not stated above. Any dog whose head is more than fifty-percent white. Any dog whose body is not more than fifty-percent white. Any dog whose head and body spots are of different colors.
 
Gait
Movement is smooth and flowing with good reach and strong drive. The topline should remain straight and head and tail carriage erect while gaiting.
Fault: Hackney gait.
 
Temperament
The Toy Fox Terrier is intelligent, alert and friendly, and loyal to its owners. He learns new tasks quickly, is eager to please, and adapts to almost any situation. The Toy Fox Terrier, like other terriers, is self-possessed, spirited, determined and not easily intimidated. He is a highly animated toy dog that is comical, entertaining and playful all of his life. Any individuals lacking good terrier attitude and personality are to be faulted.
 
Disqualifications
Any dog under 8.5 inches or over 11.5 inches.
Ears not erect on any dog over six months of age.
Dudley nose.
Undershot, wry mouth, overshot more than 1/8 inch.
A blaze extending into the eye or ears.
Any color combination not stated above.
Any dog whose head is more than fifty percent white.
Any dog whose body is not more than fifty percent white.
Any dog whose head and body spots are of different colors.
 
Approved: July 8, 2003
Effective: August 27, 2003



Note: The original breed standard was Approved: July 11, 2000 and became Effective: April 1, 2001 after which time, there were significant changes as reflected above.

There is no reference to the changes on the AKC website or the Toy Fox Terrier Club Of America site.

The first approved history and breed standard does however appear in its original form on www.TheDogPlace.org, one of the first dog information websites and the first to publish the UKC and AKC Toy Fox Terrier Breed Standards. Those wishing to do further research can click to go directly to the original AKC Toy Fox Terrier Standard

The Reference section contains stories, "Do Toy Fox Terriers.....", Weight Pulling, Agility Breed Stars, and so much more.

Have fun. History may have been re-written but breeders today are making history!

 


UKC Grand Ch. Toy Fox Terrier

Very early UKC Toy Fox Terrier National Grand Champion Gorden's Shamrock Lad, courtesy Eliza Hopkins.  Date unknown but quality is visibly top notch!

 


Winston - Dual titled Toy Fox Terrier ChampionUKC and AKC Ch. Goldenhills Gone With The Wind, sired by by UKC National Grand Ch.  Apava Jet Setter, the #1 All Time sire. "Winston" was briefly owned by Toy Fox Terriers O'BJ where he contributed his impeccable front, rear, and rock solid topline, but not his body length.

 


Toy Fox Terrier mother and puppiesMargo Carter's UKC Ch. "Precious" a Top Producer in UKC and for the Phoenix breeding program.
Precious lived well over 16 years, went everywhere with Margo and was indeed most precious!



Use the menu bar at top to get around the site.  If you are looking for a puppy, go to Puppies For Sale

 

For accurate insight on how the breed  developed, visit "Unabridged" Breed History for interesting information on how the breed was developed - and how it wasn't.


I hope you have found the site interesting and informative. There is much more to explore in the Gene Bank which contains a lot of historical pre-AKC photos and (gasp) gets into genetics just a little.
 

About The Breeder explains how important the Breeder's Pedigree is and how having a knowledgeable mentor can make it all come together for new owners.

 


Learn why soundness and agility is still important in this feature story
Toy Fox Terrier Agility Champions

 

Go to www.TheDogPress.com for unaligned news and breed features, dubbed The "National Enquirer" for the showing fancy.

 

CONTACT AND COPYRIGHT

Mrs. Andrews may be reached at (828) 286-9944 between noon and 8 PM (EST) or contact BJ in the beautiful Smokey Mountain Foothills of Rutherfordton, North Carolina

 

Copyright 2002  Barbara J. Andrews.  All rights reserved.  Except for brief reference quotations with source provided, no portions thereof may be stored or reprinted in any form, electronic or otherwise, without prior express written consent of Barbara J. Andrews